Learn English phrasal verbs | Run over

Do you run over to your friends when you're excited to see them? Do you run over your notes before an exam? Find out all the meanings of run over to help you understand English phrasal verbs...

Listen out for examples of English phrasal verbs all around you. Here are some good examples...

The roads are a dangerous place. Here's an example of a very lucky escape for a cyclist in China who gets run over by a lorry...

This young cyclist gets a real shock when he nearly runs over a rattlesnake...

And finally, this news reporter nearly gets run over by a marching band!

So how do you remember English phrasal verbs? Tell us in the comments below...

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

If you run over to someone, it means you go to meet someone very quickly, you're very excited to see them and so you run towards them to show them how happy you are to see them.

However, if you run someone over, this normally means you're driving a car and you hit someone with your car. I was crossing the road when this crazy driver nearly ran me over!

If something runs over it means that there is plenty or there is too much of something. So if you're having a bath and you fill the bath with water, but the bath runs over, it means there's too much water in the bath and the water starts to come out of the bath and onto the floor, which can obviously create a big problem for your house. You need to turn the taps off very quickly!

You can run over your notes before an exam, which means to look at your notes again, to revise your notes to prepare yourself for an exam.

If you have a meeting or you have a class and the meeting or the class runs over, it means it goes on for too long and you go overtime and maybe take the time of the next class or the next meeting that need to use the same room. So you say "We have to end now because we've run over and someone else needs to use the room".

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