Learn English phrasal verbs | Put up

How do you put up with people you don't like? Do you always put up a good fight? What does it mean to 'put up or shut up'? Find out all the uses of put up to understand English phrasal verbs...

There are plenty of examples around us of English phrasal verbs. Here's how to put up a tent in 30 seconds...

...and this is how NOT to put up a tent...

Ozzy Osbourne says that his wife Sharon is great for putting up with him...

Waiters often have to put up with a lot from the customers...

College Humor do a great spoof of the famous song from Grease and the line 'Did she put up a fight'?

A reviewer from Marketwatch says on the Wall Street Journal that the iPhone should put up or shut up!

...and here's 70's Cop Show with Put Up or Shut Up...

So how do you remember English phrasal verbs? Tell us in the comments below...

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

You could put someone up for the night, which means to give someone somewhere to stay for the night, so you could put someone up in your house. If your friend needs somewhere to stay, you can say: 'I'll put you up tonight'. Come and stay at my house, I'll put you up for two nights.

You could put up a statue or put up a building, which means to erect a statue or to build a building.

A business could put up its prices, which means to raise its prices. Your landlord could put up the rent, which means to charge you more money to stay in your house. This happens a lot in London as it's a very expensive city to live in.

If you want to sell something you own, you could put it up for sale. So if you want to sell your house, you could put your house up for sale. If you want to sell your car, you could put your car up for sale. This means to advertise your house or your car so you can sell it.

You could put up a good fight!  If you get into an argument, it could be a physical argument or a verbal argument, if you put up a good fight, it means to defend yourself well.

You could put up money for a project, if you want to invest in a project, you could give somebody the money to help them to complete a project, so 'put up money for a project'.

And a woman could put up her hair. So very often women with long hair, if they go to a social function might put up their hair, which means to wear their hair in a more sophisticated and elegant way.

If somebody is criticising you and arguing with you, but you want some proof about what they're saying, you can say: 'Put up or shut up!' If you can't prove what you're saying, don't say anything. Don't criticise me! 'Put up or shut up!'

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